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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
if it weren't for the ipad, the uk sales figures would be extraordinarily weak. >> yes. although, you know, for the uk economy, the consumer sector is not the weakest point. i think what is interesting about the uk economy in the last six months is this quite stronger than expected growth. if you look at the gdp number. but a very worrisome trend. so a liberal market that remains very, very firm with respect to other similar economic weakness. and i think that is what we really have to solve on the uk economy to know if this relativerelativ relatively soft, but also, i mean, rather encouraging if you look at other european countries numbers. i think we will have to wait until well into next year to understand if this is going to have a long-lasting consequences on the uk economy and also on the consumer sector. it's too early to say. >> you mentioned it's not necessarily the consumer where we're looking at the gauge of growth in the uk. but we see the employment figures be relatively strong even at a time when gdp generally is weak. what's the disconnect between what we're seeing in the em
july, 2011. up .5%. yields coming down during the session yesterday. employment numbers out of the u.k. in around 15 minutes or so. we'll keep our eyes on that. yields also -- treasury yields, 1.67%. gild yields, 1.63. and bond yields higher. they got kicked higher in germany post that survey which we broke on the show, as well. as far as the currency market, dollar bit under pressure ahead of the fed. euro/dollar 130.08. we were down late friday and early monday trade, as well. dollar/yen, highs polls suggest mr. erbe will be a clear win in japan. however big will the lead be and what influence tell have on the bank of japan. dollar and yen pressured by more q.e. talk. and aussillar three-month high. the prospect of q.e. boosting commodityets. canadian doing well. firm at 1.6122. we have more on the asian trading day out of singapore. >> reporter: hi, thank you, ross. most asian markets finished on a bright note. the shanghai composite recouped morning losses in positive territory. property stocks turned higher in the afternoon. stocks also rallied while investors await beijing's det
export performance, creating jobs in the manufacturing sector. but germany and the uk need europe to improve. >> it comes at an inkrd eblly high cost in terms of the number of people out of work. what has been done? how much have we destroyed so that the jobs outlook and growth prospect in this country? >> well, what growth prospect in the southern european countries? we're seeing definitive bifurcation of northern europe and southern europe. southern europe, we are creating an underclass of long-term, especially youth unemployed that is going to give us a problem when the economies eventually start to get into balance and start to pick up. we still have this issue, even though we have tens of millions of people out of work, we still can't find the right skills and the right time. >> you mentioned the uk. the unemployment picture never got that bad in britain. so what happens now? why did it outperform? >> the uk is so different from the rest of europe. we've got london, the financial services sector, that didn't actually, in terms of job numbers, get hit as hard as the rest of eu
ourses to our international competitors, our economy here in the uk is growing by 0.6%, whereas in germany, we've seen growth of 3.6%. in the u.s., growth of #.1% during the same period. so certainly not a cause for celebration. still a difficult operating environment. under the former chancellor's plan, we would have been borrowing less in the next three years. because the government has failed to get our economy growing and because the policies have pushed us into recent double dip recession, they'll be pr rowing 212 billion pounds more than they planned. put that in context, that is the equivalent of what we in the uk will be spending this financial year on health, transport and defense in aggregate. >> you were talking quite rightly about the low level of he have credit growth in the uk, which has obviously been a feature of this period. but there's a question of what's cause and what's effect there. the banks will tell you that that problem is not so much availability of credit, there's credit demand and even in the mortgage sector which under normal circumstances you might
, if you look at uk they have a culture of violent games, the same games and everything around. obviously, they don't have these same shoot problems. if you like at japan, they have the most vicious, violent video games of anybody, and they don't have these issues. they don't have a murder rate. >> guess what? tell your hollywood friends, we got hundreds of millions of guns on the street. we ain't japan, so you fight the war on the battlefield before you and the battlefield before us is there is easy access to guns. there will be easy access to guns regardless of what gun safety legislation. >> to parents while i still have control, because you lose it as they get older, don't let them do it. find something else. it's hard. it's easier said than done because a lot of kids sit there for hours and it's their baby-sitter, but no. >> steve, i understand that's not your position, but i'm hearing this a lot of from people in hollywood. no response. quentin tarantino was unbelievable incense it actisen. what a total jackass. left wingers say i want to -- there's a slippery slope on first amendme
favorite example, which i went back and looked at it kind of horrified me. uk's might remember this widely reported. in january 2007, think about that date january 2007, mike bloomberg and chuck schumer, commissioned a report from mckenzie when new york was falling behind compared to london. to be the support you can google it in 30 seconds. it's shocking the main problem, the single biggest thing holding back the u.s. economy is overly harsh regulation of credit derivatives. it's in this report you will start a section on credit derivatives, how we need less regulation of them otherwise london will take over global finance. what was amazing at the time is everybody agreed that this report. eliot spitzer was quoted saying how great this was. chuck schumer was one of the sponsors in the u.k. labor was running the u.k. and even the critics said this report showed that even the labor is kind of spending far too much money on the nhs at least they give regulation right. so there was a very widespread bipartisan kind of economic faculties of the western world bought into this and that played a
together, a tight pressure gradient, up to 120 kilometers per hour especially along the west coast of the u.k. and towards ireland, that's continuing to push to the northeast. it's going to be raising up temperatures. we'll see rain in the scandanavian peninsula and the threat there is snow melt and avalanche. farther towards the south, things will be remaining on the dry side. you'll see temperatures near the freezing mark towards vienna. 2 degrees for the high. london and paris, as warm air pulls in, you're seeing above average temperatures. london and paris 11 and 13 on your saturday. madrid, up to 11 degrees. let's look over towards eastern asia into japan. starting to bring heavy rain showers, you've been seeing 50 to 80 millimeters and now the rain is ending and shifting over towards eastern japan, even into tokyo, you're seeing rain into western tokyo. on the other hand a mix of the white stuff in there. doesn't look like it will be accumulating too much in the downtown area. don't be surprised if you do so 'see a flurry or two of the white stuff throughout the overnight hours. behind
to the rest of the world, if you look at germany, uk, japan, france, all of whom have very strong gun regulations, we have more gun deaths in one week than they have in an entire year, and the incidents -- the number of times in which guns inside a home are used for self-defense are exceedingly small, on the order of maybe 1 in 15, 1 in 20 as compared to the number of times when a gun is used either for suicide or a homicide. anybody that looks at the data here is quite clear that on the whole, particularly things like assault weapons, create far, far more kor nage in th carnage in this country than they prevent. to a large extent the reason why i think progressives have not been able to mount an effective campaign for sensible gun laws, it's been a failure of the progressive movement, and i think that will now change with progressives. they must realize they have to make this an election issue. all of the polls show that the public is widely in favor of sensible gun regulations. i will point out what i said on friday. president clinton after columbine when we were meeting in the oval
capped. spain requesting financial assistance. we'll keep our eye on the uk as we head toward the bank of england meeting this week p. dollar index has hit a one month low. you're redollar up to euro-dollar up near the high we saw yesterday. dollar-yen moving away from the 7 1/2 month high. rebounding against the dollar and the euro ir, as well. priced in a lot in terms of monetary policy out of japan. and aussie dollar, 1.0463, yes, we have cut the cash rate in australia to match the record low of 3%. but we see the aussie dollar rise because it's pretty much all priced in. sterling-dollar also getting a benefit. back over 1.61. so that's where we stand in european trade. let's recap the asian trading session for the first time today, when you not the last. >> thank you, ross.not the last. >> thank you, ross. shanghai composite recovered from its four year low as property financials, rebounded. shale gas and geothermal plays also rallied as beijing plans to cut its annual coal consumption target by 2015. the hang seng finished m eed marginally in the green. losses in the services sect
across the southern portions of the uk, though. what this is going to be bringing is the risk of flooding. last week you saw very significant flooding here, and the ground is already stamp rated so you do not need any more rainfall coming across this yair. speaking of flooding, turkey, flashflooding, also at risk of a strong and severe storm system pushing across the country on your friday and going into the weekend. temperatures remain rather cold into the west, moscow, mais now 4 for your high, and 5 and 6 in london and paris starting off your weekend. now here's a look at your extended forecast. ♪ >>> we'll be back with more updates in 30 minutes. i'm gene otani in tokyo.
. as you can see there, the uk gilt is telling offer a little bit. yield riding to 1.78%. whether it's the bund or even yields in spain are falling as prices rise a little bit. so there is light at the end of the tunnel according to our next guest. he says the global economy is close to reaching its weakest point before recovery sets in. he's robert cohen, chief equity strategist. woke. >> good morning. >> we just heard rob doddson talking through some of these results. unfortunately, we saw some signs of weaker demand, especially global demand in these reports. but perhaps what is consistent with what you're saying, why is it your view that that is going to happen? >> sometimes you need to pull away. you move away from the fundamentals a little bit on the month to month improvements. if you look at 2013 as a whole, the big headwinds you've had in a number of years, fiscal austerity is largely the sarp in europe year on year. 2014, that comes up quite quickly. 2013 is largely going to be the final year of the crushing deleveraging if you like on the european banks. so essentially the
as analysts cut their outlook for the uk power group. >> okay. welcome. it's the start of a brand new week here on "worldwide exchange." and don't adjust your set, kelly and i are together. >> for once, for a day. >> but make the most of it because it won't be lasting. >> if only there were a slo-mo. >> i'm going to enjoy as much as i can of today. >> and likewise. and then we're going to have to get all of our u.s. voouers to find cnbc world because they could get three hours of you, carol and carolin for the rest of the week. >> whatever they can do. record it and fast forward to the good bits. >> yeah. >> it will be 2:00, 3:00 in the morning or whatever. >>> on today's show, plenty to come on. >> yes. the south american union faces ejection from the imf for allegedly cooking its books about the innation rate. we'll head out to europe where the swiss banking giants could be facing $1.6 billion over libor rate rigging allegations. >> and we'll be on the floor in beijing where china's leaders just wrapped up a major conference. >>> and japan's prime minister election is calling on the bank
in australia and france and the uk and happens in japan, but for some reason i don't see them grieving over 20 children that have been slain in their schools. that does come down to a question of our gun problem and gun culture and the way we cope with it. i know the families in this town when they are past their grieving and they never will be, but one of the things people want to do here in newtown united is to give them a platform and a voice and let's hear what they have to say. >> two things you mentioned. newtown united and the goals for the organization. you mentioned having knew or met nancy lanza. can you give impressions of her from meeting her? >> it is a small town and a bunch of us play tuesday night ultimate frisbee in one of the local playing fields. we want to have a beer and we go to this place called my place. you have seen it on the news. nancy was i don't want to say a regular, but she was there and i chatted with her. a seemingly pleasant person and i'm sure she was. that's it. that's how small towns work, right? when i wait and saw i knew a number of people who lost a lov
are doing today. in the uk and p many other parts of world people celebrate boxing day, much like black friday in the united states. retailers offer extreme discounts. crowds of up people fill the streets and stores today hoping to take advantage of those sa s sales. some brave folks in the czech republic took on a freezing river during the traditional christmas swim. the temperature there was 46 degrees fahrenheit. >>> i'm suzanne malveaux. the renewed debate over guns in america playing out is sever fronts today. we'll get right to it. it sfwens fied after the horrific shooting in a newtown, connecticut school that left 6 adults and 20 first graders dead. today los angeles is holding a gun buy-back program. it's usually in may but the mayor decided to move it up after the newtown shootings. >> people want to do something, particularly after the newtown tragedy. now this latest tragedy where two firefighters were shot and killed. they want to act. they're tired of waiting on the congress and our legislatures to do something. they feel like there's too much talk and not enough action,
of with the british system, and in the u.k. incentivize with the preventive checks, blood pressure, cholesterol, urine checks and in the hospital, they get incentivized and rewarded. in massachusetts if the doctor does not save them money, then the doctors get penalized. stuart: and how do you judge, is it cost per patient per lifetime that the doctor is judged on? >> so what's happening here is that doctors are entering into contracts with insurance companies and they're given what's called a global budget. and they get a set amount of money to take care of a patient. if they look after those patients economically and save money they're rewarded. if they do not look after patients and spend money excessively and doctors are penalized and they're tracking it. stuart: that's interesting. let's suppose you've got a universe of 200 patients for one doctor. we'll give you x number of dollars to treat 200 people. you go above the dollars you're going to get penalized and come out of your pocket. keep below that number, the total cost of 200. you're incentivized and keep the difference. >> that's how it wor
're not being impacted at this stage. we are in the france, uk and spain and all of our businesses are growing in each market. we're hiring in all of those markets. anybody who wants to know. >> have you changed the mix of samples depending on the economic environment? for instance in 2008 did you have maybe a lower end price point product as well as a higher end or no? >> that's one thing about the beauty industry, trends are always changing. it's an accessible luxury. you've heard of the lipstick effect. when the company goes down people want to treat themselves. one thing we've seen this year is male trends. nail polish, nail art. >> carl loves nail polish. he just loves it. >> what are all those people who give out samples in department stores going to do when you put them out of business? >> they're doing something different. department store sampling and sampling in stores is a loyalty moment. it's not a great thing to do for customer acquisition. you still have to get a customer to walk up to you. we're doing something really different. it's customer acquisition and it's in a very targe
on this day after christmas. the uk and france among those celebrating foxing day. we start off with, what else, retail. dips in spending in the mid-atlantic and northeast regions. luxury sales also weak. >> we're coming off the worst christmas eve for the dow since 2006. as the president cuts short his hawaiian vacation to deal with the fiscal cliff, just five days to go until we go over. >> threatening both coasts with workers snubbing up best and final contract offer. >> and more on the home front. we'll have more on the data and whether it can keep one of the best performing sectors of 2012, home builders going in 2013. >> data showing what some experts say is the slowest growth in spending since the 2008 recession. according to mastercard, spending polls units through christmas eve, retail sales rose just .7% from the year before. the national retail federation says it is forecasting a 4% jump in sales. we'll continue to get trickles of data as we progress through this last week. it is still an important week, the final week before the new year in terms of retail sales for these guys.
and will probably happen in europe. the u.k. specialized in being the home of trading. they certainly don't want that to be taxed. so yes, there are people in congress. i think wall street is now the number-one contributor to political campaigns, or at least it is in the running for number one. i have been to washington many times and am involved with several groups that are trying to reform the business sector. it is very difficult because of the sheer amount of money that the finance sector is pouring into lobbying and campaign contributions. >> let's give a round of applause for lynn. [applause] we have the opportunity for you to purchase and have the book signed. we thank you all for being here. if you have further questions, she will be here signing books, so come and talk to her. >> in the fall of 1774, the british admiral and generals and diplomats were reporting to the crown that the colonists for sending ships everywhere to try to get ammunition and muskets and cannons. this was after the british sent more troops to boston after the boston tea party and so-called subversive acts. it is
know now that she's pregnant. she's being looked after by the top doctors in the u.k. they would argue. we'll see what happens. certainly we're going to be here for a few days, ashleigh. monitoring the situation for you. senior royals have been informed. prince harry, they're trying to get ahold of to inform him. prince william is in there supporting her. >> just quickly, while we're all excited about a royal pregnancy and the lavishness of their lives and all the rest. it can't be understated she could be pregnant with a future king or queen. >> well, it's interesting, this debate because you would understand from what politicians have told you that they have changed the act of succession to allow the first born, if it is a girl, to become queen. that's not actually the case. very, very complicated legal procedures have to be gone through. they haven't even identified the laws that they have to change in order to do that. they go back hundreds of years. there's a committee in new zealand that's debating this. there are several countries, 15 countries, that have to agree to change this
's grappling with the same question helped by some decent uk inflation data today. and a t-bill auction in spain. our road map begins with what appear to be significant progress in the debt negotiations overnight. a whose proposal looking to raise rates for those making more than $400,000 a year. but senator corker on squawk just poured a bucket of ice water on those hopes. >> whitney boosts her recommendations on citi, bank of america and discover financial. is that move by one of the more famous financial bears, a sign of a new era for banks? >> walmart is once again the target of a "new york times" investigation. but does the paper add anything new and can the stock outperform just as it did last time. >> private equity firm server said it will sell the firearms conglomerate. is private equity talking about guns in the country. >> futures moving higher on optimism. the white house republicans rising above partisanship, getting closer to striking a deal on the fiscal cliff. we have the latest on not just the breakdown of this offer, but by the response of some key senators this mornin
to protect pol pots of the world. we'll never accomplish a ban. we'll never have a uk -- >> let's talk about that. people are talking about a sensible conversation. >> can i pause for one moment? >> this is the kind of thing that we're not allowed to chat about and we should. >> you mentioned the second amendment and everybody refers to it. let's read it first. here is the second amendment, literally what it says, a well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed. >> it has nothing to do with hunting or personal self-defense. these people had just beaten the british and enshined the ability to ton have civilian protection. that's why we're different. >> but this is -- this is -- this is the fundamental problem i have with that. and i get it, i understand historically how we came to that point. but i'm not trying to fight the federal government. i'm not trying to grab a .9 millimeter and say i don't want a federal trooper coming into my home. we have to reach a point in this country when you have --
. concerns over the uk economy. so we'll see how investors take to what's probably going to be a loosening up of the budget targets the chancellor set when they came into power. so we'll keep our eyes on that. and at the moment today, more talks in brussels. the greeks now getting their buy back program approved 37 trying to sort out a single supervisor. i think these talks will be fairly tricky because there is a majority who bt with a tant the be supervisor for all the banks. german didn't like that. so those talks will go on longer than originally hoped. but we are marginally higher going to the u.s. open. thank you. >> kelly, thank you. i'll just call you r kelly in now. >> that's not bad. >> ross, thank you. great to see you. >>> when we come back on squawk, bank of america ceo brian moynihan in his own words, we caught up with him yesterday to talk about business, the economy and the looming figure. as we head into a break, bank of america, best performing dow component of the year. up about 77%. ♪ [ male announcer ] how could switchgrass in argentina, change engineering in dubai, alu
territory. so we're firmly in recession here in the eurozone and in the uk as well. we saw services pmi come in weaker than expected. contraction territory for new orders -- this is the british chancellor today. george osbourne will be delivering his autumn statement where he's probably going to say growth isn't strong enough so we're going to not really meet our budget targets as well. all these things coming into play at the moment as we wait for the u.s. session. we did have a good piece of news, though, out of china. the new leadership saying wle do whatever it takes to maintain solid economic growth. the shanghai composite up nearly 3% today. that boosted retail stocks. we also had a spanish bond auction, prefunding for 2013. got nearly the 4.5 billion they wanted. yields in spain. the ten-year did come lower on that auction, so not a bad result. and bid to cover was okay. so spanish yields slightly higher after that. didn't raise the maximum amount. that's where we stand. it's another cautious day under way in europe. back to you guys. >> might get my haircut like hers, ross. you know,
. and pervasive, they call it manipulation of libor by dozens of staff. the penalty was agreed to with u.s., u.k., and swiss regulators. it is more than three times the $450 million fine that was levied on barclays in june. the second largest fine ever on a paid -- paid by a bank. it only was topped by the $1.9 billion penalty that hsbc agreed to last week to settle that money laundering probe. >> crazy thing that stock's up. it's leading the exchange there today because people had been expecting maybe a slightly higher fine even than that. three times the amount. it was supposedly taking place for five to seven years, 30 to 40 traders have left. pretty pervasive. >> i wonder how much they -- they make money or lose money after -- >> after all was said and done. $1.5 billion. >> probably lost. they did well. the libor stuff, if you can set rates -- >> well, and the crazy thing, it affects so many different instruments and so many people and so many businesses. >> right. >> i don't know that you could ever actually figure out all the implications from it. >> right. from everyone. and in a related
will close at 12:30. facebook is accused of dodging taxes in the uk. the london "times" said they tried to hide taxes. a tablet for under $100, the journal said acer selling a $99 tablet next year. similar to the amazon kindle fire and barnes & noble nook color. >> by now, we all should certainly know about the fiscal cliff, shouldn't we. but there's another so-called cliff that's getting people's attention. brian shactman has more. >> some calling it the container cliff. negotiations broke down late last week. that could be bad news from massachusetts to texas. if there's no deal, several thousand dock workers could walk off the job at 15 ports at 12:01 a.m. on december 30th. this includes the port of new york and new jersey, which is the largest on the east coast, handling more than $200 billion worth of goods in 2011. a lot of that from china. the basic issue is this. there are container royalty fees which supplement wages. the employers want the amount capped. the dock workers do not. this is such a big deal florida governor rick scott sent a three-page letter to the president late
, even though the u.k. is kicking and screaming because they specialize in being the home of trading, whether trading in stocks or derivatives or anything else. they simply do not want that to be taxed. there are people in congress. i think wall street is now the number-one contributor to political campaigns. at least, it is in the running for number-one. i have been to washington many times and i'm involved with several groups that are trying to reform the business sector so that it can work, so that it can survive. it is very difficult because of the sheer amount of money that the finance sector in particular is pouring into lobbying and campaign contributions. it is very difficult. >> let's give a round of applause for lin. -- lynn. [applause] there is an opportunity for you to purchase and have the but signed. if you have court-further questions, she will be here signing books. thank you all and have a safe trip home. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> all this month we have been talking with retirin
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)

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